COVID-19

COVID-19 has now reached pandemic classification according to the World Health Organization. Visit their site for informative videos and instructions on how to interact with this concern in your area.

The live numbers

If you're curious about tracking the spread of actual numbers affected by this virus, Worldometer, and GIS and Data are both helpful resources.

Clicking on either of these links will bring you to clear information about which countries are encountering the illness directly. They note the number of active cases, actual deaths, and overall counts via graphs and other graphics.

What should I do if I think I'm sick?

CALL 811 (do not go to an emergency room).

If you have symptoms such as fever, cough and difficulty breathing and have travelled outside Canada or have been exposed to someone who has COVID-19, stay home and call Health Link 811. If you are not seriously ill, do not go to a physician’s office, a health care facility or a lab without consulting with Health Link 811 first. Call 911 if you are seriously ill and need immediate medical attention and inform them that you may have COVID-19.

What is self-isolation

Self-isolation means avoiding situations where you could infect other people. This means all situations where you may come in contact with others, such as social gatherings, work, school, child care, athletic events, university, faith-based gatherings, healthcare facilities, grocery stores, restaurants, shopping malls, and all public gatherings.

You should, (where possible) not use public transportation including buses, taxis, or ride sharing.

As much as possible, you should limit contact with people other than the family members/companions who you travelled with.

You should avoid having visitors to your home, but it is okay for friends, family or delivery drivers to drop off food.

You can also use delivery or pick up services for errands such as grocery shopping.

Avoid sharing household items such as dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, pillows, or other items with other people in your home. After using these items, you should wash them thoroughly with soap and water, place in the dishwasher for cleaning, or wash in the washing machine.

Wash your hands often with soap and water and regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched and shared surfaces such as doorknobs and counters.

If you need to leave your home for an urgent errand, such as picking up essential medication, as a precaution to reduce risk of spread, you should wear a surgical mask while you are out.

During this time, it is important that you monitor your health for symptoms like fever or cough, and call Health Link 811 if you have any concerns.

How can I protect myself?

To help protect against all respiratory illnesses, including the flu and COVID-19, you should:

Wash your hands often and well. Refer to hand-washing guidance here: https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/info/Page14955.aspx

Avoid touching your face, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands. o Avoid close contact with people who are sick

Clean and disinfect surfaces that are frequently touched

Stay at home and away from others if you are feeling ill

When sick, cover your cough and sneezes and then wash your hands. Refer to respiratory etiquette guidance here: https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/info/Page14511.aspx

Coronavirus, COVID-19

With Coronavirus on our minds, let's take in what the professionals are saying. Further, let's exercise our own good judgement.

World Health Organization

The WHO notes,

Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases. These include Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A new strain is Coronavirus (nCoV)

Coronaviruses are transmitted between animals and people.  SARS-CoV was transmitted from civet cats to humans and MERS-CoV from dromedary camels to humans. Several known coronaviruses are circulating in animals that have not yet infected humans. 

Common signs of infection include respiratory symptoms. Fever, cough, shortness of breath and breathing difficulties can present. In addition, in more severe cases, infection can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure, and even death. 

Standard recommendations to prevent infection spread include regular hand washing. Morever, covering mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing, as well as thoroughly cooking meat and eggs is smart. Not only that, avoid close contact with anyone showing symptoms of respiratory illness such as coughing and sneezing.

WHO on Coronavirus

Global News on COVID-19

COVID-19 cases in Canada are mild. Canadian cases are all travel-related.

How to take precautions

We are not strangers to the threat of pandemics or outbreaks. As you recall, SARS, the bird flu, and others have all grabbed our attention in recent years. What is a wise response to concerning news about health risks such as these?

While panic and catastrophic thinking are unhelpful, a measured approach to having a stock of ready supplies may bring some peace of mind? Toiletries, water, non-perishable food, and a stack of really good books may be a good place to start. Two weeks' worth won't take up much space, and it may come in handy.

If you're symptomatic, stay home. We can each do our part to stem a spread if we ourselves are unwell. This is good practice with any flu or cold: we can respect our selves and our others simply by resting and healing when we're sick.

While you're tucked in

If you're under the weather and finding some unexpected down time, consider our 800 charities and the work they're doing to aid the vulnerable, ill, and unseen every day.

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Winter Blues

Today I re-routed my errands. Instead of just ticking off the to-do list musts, I took a 5 minute wander into the seasonal section at Canadian Tire. Winter blues haven't been the specter this year that they have been in winters past. But this is the season for getting ahead of them, and one of the ways I do that is by thinking about dirt and fertilizer and seeds.

There's something about the scent of earth and the hope that I'll soon have a spade in one hand, and a satchel of seeds in the other. Spring doesn't feel so far off, even as February holds us in a winter grip.

Seasonal Affective Disorder

Winter blues and Seasonal Affective Disorder aren't necessarily one and the same. SAD is a medically acknowledged condition, and sufferers may benefit from treatment.

The Mayo Clinic notes, in most cases, seasonal affective disorder symptoms appear during late fall or early winter and go away during the sunnier days of spring and summer. Less commonly, people with the opposite pattern have symptoms that begin in spring or summer. In either case, symptoms may start out mild and become more severe as the season progresses.

Signs and symptoms of SAD may include:

  • Feeling depressed most of the day, nearly every day
  • Losing interest in activities you once enjoyed
  • Having low energy
  • Having problems with sleeping
  • Experiencing changes in your appetite or weight
  • Feeling sluggish or agitated
  • Having difficulty concentrating
  • Feeling hopeless, worthless or guilty
  • Having frequent thoughts of death or suicide

Fall and winter SAD

Symptoms specific to winter-onset SAD, sometimes called winter depression, may include:

  • Oversleeping
  • Appetite changes, especially a craving for foods high in carbohydrates
  • Weight gain
  • Tiredness or low energy

Spring and summer SAD

Symptoms specific to summer-onset seasonal affective disorder, sometimes called summer depression, may include:

  • Trouble sleeping (insomnia)
  • Poor appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Agitation or anxiety

Creative treatments

Light therapy and medications may be effective in treating the winter blues, and SAD.

Canadian Living's online magazine offers some helpful guidance on managing mental health at this time of year. Getting out into the sunshine whenever possible is high on the list. Furthermore, consider taking up a winter sport, or throwing a winter social event. Take on a new project and set goals for yourself. Moreover, give your own mental health some of the attention you may not once the weather shifts and life picks up the pace again.

In addition to these useful self-care tips, consider caring for others. A little generosity of spirit can go a long way. Take care of the caretakers in your life. Check-in with the folks who seem to have it all together. Give! Share your time, your heart, your creativity, your resources. It's easier to shiver through the winter doldrums when offering warmth and support to others.

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Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada

The Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada believe that those affected by brain tumours should never go through life alone. Your vehicle donation can help ensure that reality.

The facts

Twenty-seven Canadians are diagnosed with a brain tumour every day. Here are more facts about brain tumours:
  • 55,000 Canadians are surviving with a brain tumour.
  • Treatment is complicated, and there are over 120 different types of brain tumours.
  • Furthermore, 23.5 new cases of primary brain tumours are estimated per 100,000 population per year. (Data from Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario).
  • In the first year after diagnosis, the average patient will make 52 visits to their health care team. This could include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, blood work etc.

What is a brain tumour

  • A brain tumour is a growth of abnormal cells that are either within or around the structure of the brain.
  • Non-malignant tumours account for almost two thirds of all primary brain tumours.
  • The most common type of primary malignant brain tumour is glioblastoma. Moreover, average survival, even with aggressive treatment, is less than one year.
  • Metastatic brain tumours occur at some point in 20-40% of people with cancer. The incidence of metastatic brain tumours is increasing as cancer patients live longer.
  • Brain tumours are the leading cause of solid cancer death in children under the age of 20. Further, they are the third leading cause of solid cancer death in young adults ages 20-39.
  • Because brain tumours are located at the control centre for thought, emotion, and movement, they dramatically affect an individual’s physical and cognitive abilities. In consequence, quality of life is altered.
  • Brain tumours in children are different from those in adults and are often treated differently. 60% of children with brain tumours will survive, however, they are left with long-term side effects.
  • Enhancing the quality of life for people with brain tumours requires access to quality specialty care. Moreover, they may require clinical trials, follow-up care, and rehabilitative services.
  • Accurate data will help researchers understand the disease and improve treatment for those affected. To this end, the Brain Tumour Registry of Canada was launched in May 2019.

Take a look

Close to home

This cause hits close to home. Two of our Donate a Car Canada employees have friends and loved ones who have been afflicted by brain tumours. When a life is lost to sickness like this, the ripple effects continue on in the hearts of those left behind. When a brain tumour is survived, lives continue to be altered by after effects.

This is one of DACC's 800+ Canadian charities. We've made them our charity of the month for February. If you, or someone you care about, are impacted by brain tumour(s), donate your car through our program! Every dollar donated makes a difference.

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Acura RDX, 2020

The 2020 Acura RDX is beloved by reviewers and drivers alike. The ride, the cargo space, and the economy. What's not to love? Well, the non-Android-compatible, not-touch-screen multi-media system. And yet, reviewers agree: utility and performance make the Acura RDX a win for the money.

Car Gurus have their say

"A capable, spacious, luxury cross-over" is George Kennedy's summation of the Acura RDX. While, he notes, it's not that much different from the 2019 model, he has a lot to say about the value and drivability of the RDX.

Trouble spots? He does highlight the Acura's infamous infotainment system. Users seem to weigh-in as having easily adapted with a little time and savvy. On the other hand, reviewers love to pin their criticism to that component.

TFLCar - The Fast Lane's review

TFL loves the Acura, but consider the multimedia system, "a nightmare." From the sounds to the unintuitive radio screen access, this reviewer is super sad about the infotainment and navigation system.

Stay with this video to learn about sport and sport plus modes. The Acura RDX has some fun features to play with!

Honda and Acura vehicle donations

Hondas and Toyotas make for strong donation outcomes. As our decade-plus files show, these makes hold their value well. Furthermore, donated Camrys and Accords bring in some of our highest donation outcomes.

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International Justice Mission

International Justice Mission partners with local authorities in 19 program offices in 11 countries. There they combat slavery, violence against women and children, and other forms of abuse against people who are poor.

Today, more than 40 million people live in slavery.
IJM believes we can end slavery in our lifetime.

The mission

International Justice Mission is facing into our world's most dangerous and dehumanizing human rights violations: slavery, trafficking, and citizenship rights. Cybersex trafficking and land theft. Police abuse of power, as well as sexual violence against children.

Impacting Canadian families

"This scholarship means to me that people do realize behind every great soldier is a family. Behind every man holding a gun is a woman holding his children. And behind every casket going down the highway of heroes is the family following."

— Gale Gillam, Daughter of Sgt Craig Gillam (Afghanistan, 2006)

"I am truly grateful for what this organization is doing for me and others like myself. To me, the Canadian Hero Fund represents hope and a helping hand to those who need it."

— Milann Mitchell, Daughter of Cpt Bryan Mitchell (Moose Jaw, 2008)

"Dad always said to my Mum, "If anything ever happens to me make sure you send the boys to good school." Canadian Hero Fund has helped tremendously by providing me with financial assistance to pursue a higher education."

— Matthew Mellish, Son of WO Frank Mellish (Afghanistan, 2006)

"The Canadian Hero Fund represents something very important. It shows that what happened to our parents is not forgotten."

— Adam Naismith, Son of Cpt Kevin Naismith (Cold Lake, 2003

Canada Helps

Another way to help

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Every dollar to our charities is useful and carefully assigned. Your donated vehicle will help the CHF's efforts. We'll take care of all of the donation details. And not only that, CHF won't have to apply any more effort than what it takes to get you your tax receipt. 'Sound like the cause for you? We'll look forward to hearing from you!

Last-minute Shopping

Last-minute shopping is upon us. Is holiday giving leading to a little too much decking in the halls, and not enough holly jolly? Consider changing things up this Christmas season!

Christmas gift exchange

'Ready to exchange the tension last minute gift shopping for the magic of Christmas? What if you could gift your loved one, and benefit others at the same time?

Some of our recipients are so easy to gift. We know what they love; they'll love what they get. Some are tricky! It seems that, no matter the thought put into the choosing, the gift is never quite right.

For those last-minute shopping stressors, there's a creatively loving solution: gift a charity in their name.

This becomes a double-gift: something in hand for your loved one; something in hand for your chosen charity.

There are many ways to do this. Gifts-in-kind is one way. Check out the examples of these inspiring young people and how they've used their birthdays to benefit charity:

Beyond Gifts-in-kind

If donating items to the animal shelter, or collecting (hundreds of pairs!) shoes for give away seems daunting, consider monetary giving.

Many of our receiving charities have Christmas giving programs set up. It's quick and simple to gift a charity in the name of a loved one.

Here are a few charities that can shift the season from tense to tinsel:

The Salvation Army is a good place to start. Your gift in a loved one's name will feed, house, and otherwise assist a person in need. Or, check out your local shelters (or those near where your friends and family live). Give where you live!

Your nearby animal shelter, or a broader work (like the World Wildlife Foundation) will use your double gift to aid critters at risk.

Has an infirmity or disease recently impacted your family? A gift to the charity that best serves in that area of need will be gratefully welcomed. If you're having trouble choosing a charity to give to, visit our charities page. We'll show the name and mission statement of the charity that best matches your gift recipient!

Giving in 2020

If you have your Christmas shopping all wrapped up, we're at the ready to receive vehicle donations in the new year. Donate your vehicle on behalf of your charity of choice, and receive a valuable tax receipt in return!

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