Best Charities: Coronavirus

The best charities to support during the ebb and flow of Coronavirus ripple effects are in sight. Savvy Canadian donors do their research. They are careful in selecting who they donate to. We want our charities to run efficiently. Well managed with modest, defensible overhead is a must. Moreover, a charity should touch into our lives personally.

Your decision to donate your vehicle has come with thought and care. Choosing the charity that will receive the monies from that effort poses a unique challenge.

This is an easy decision for some: we give from the heart to the causes that make our hearts leap! Where the money goes is top-of-mind for others. Above all, give where there will be the best bang for our giving buck.

Maclean's on who, what, why

Maclean's ezine article, "Coronavirus: Where to donate and how to help Canada's most vulnerable," offers concise and valuable direction. If you're looking to donate specifically to needs arising from the pandemic, this article will help!

Many of the charities noted in on their break-out lists are charities that we work to support daily. Note the Canadian Mental Health Association, The Salvation Army, and Food Banks Canada. These are on the short-list for monetary donation. Further, SOS Children's Villages and Kids Help Phone are high on the list.

Concerned for the personal safety of women and children in violent domestic situations, consider donating. The Canadian Women's Foundation, Vancouver Rape Relief and Women's Shelter, and your own local shelter need you.

Similarly, we have seen how aggressively COVID-19 has impacted our Canadian seniors. The Alzheimer Society in your province needs your giving dollars now.

Canadians are all affected

As you'll see in the Maclean's article, these quick acknowledgments skim the surface. We should state that impact has rippled to all sectors of our society. Consider gifting indigenous causes, or, turn your attention toward those with special needs. 'Just plum tuckered out thinking about your fellow human? Why not consider a gift to any of our animal charities? It will be welcome!

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COVID-19

COVID-19 has now reached pandemic classification according to the World Health Organization. Visit their site for informative videos and instructions on how to interact with this concern in your area.

The live numbers

If you're curious about tracking the spread of actual numbers affected by this virus, Worldometer, and GIS and Data are both helpful resources.

Clicking on either of these links will bring you to clear information about which countries are encountering the illness directly. They note the number of active cases, actual deaths, and overall counts via graphs and other graphics.

What should I do if I think I'm sick?

CALL 811 (do not go to an emergency room).

If you have symptoms such as fever, cough and difficulty breathing and have travelled outside Canada or have been exposed to someone who has COVID-19, stay home and call Health Link 811. If you are not seriously ill, do not go to a physician’s office, a health care facility or a lab without consulting with Health Link 811 first. Call 911 if you are seriously ill and need immediate medical attention and inform them that you may have COVID-19.

What is self-isolation

Self-isolation means avoiding situations where you could infect other people. This means all situations where you may come in contact with others, such as social gatherings, work, school, child care, athletic events, university, faith-based gatherings, healthcare facilities, grocery stores, restaurants, shopping malls, and all public gatherings.

You should, (where possible) not use public transportation including buses, taxis, or ride sharing.

As much as possible, you should limit contact with people other than the family members/companions who you travelled with.

You should avoid having visitors to your home, but it is okay for friends, family or delivery drivers to drop off food.

You can also use delivery or pick up services for errands such as grocery shopping.

Avoid sharing household items such as dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, pillows, or other items with other people in your home. After using these items, you should wash them thoroughly with soap and water, place in the dishwasher for cleaning, or wash in the washing machine.

Wash your hands often with soap and water and regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched and shared surfaces such as doorknobs and counters.

If you need to leave your home for an urgent errand, such as picking up essential medication, as a precaution to reduce risk of spread, you should wear a surgical mask while you are out.

During this time, it is important that you monitor your health for symptoms like fever or cough, and call Health Link 811 if you have any concerns.

How can I protect myself?

To help protect against all respiratory illnesses, including the flu and COVID-19, you should:

Wash your hands often and well. Refer to hand-washing guidance here: https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/info/Page14955.aspx

Avoid touching your face, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands. o Avoid close contact with people who are sick

Clean and disinfect surfaces that are frequently touched

Stay at home and away from others if you are feeling ill

When sick, cover your cough and sneezes and then wash your hands. Refer to respiratory etiquette guidance here: https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/info/Page14511.aspx

Coronavirus, COVID-19

With Coronavirus on our minds, let's take in what the professionals are saying. Further, let's exercise our own good judgement.

World Health Organization

The WHO notes,

Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases. These include Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A new strain is Coronavirus (nCoV)

Coronaviruses are transmitted between animals and people.  SARS-CoV was transmitted from civet cats to humans and MERS-CoV from dromedary camels to humans. Several known coronaviruses are circulating in animals that have not yet infected humans. 

Common signs of infection include respiratory symptoms. Fever, cough, shortness of breath and breathing difficulties can present. In addition, in more severe cases, infection can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure, and even death. 

Standard recommendations to prevent infection spread include regular hand washing. Morever, covering mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing, as well as thoroughly cooking meat and eggs is smart. Not only that, avoid close contact with anyone showing symptoms of respiratory illness such as coughing and sneezing.

WHO on Coronavirus

Global News on COVID-19

COVID-19 cases in Canada are mild. Canadian cases are all travel-related.

How to take precautions

We are not strangers to the threat of pandemics or outbreaks. As you recall, SARS, the bird flu, and others have all grabbed our attention in recent years. What is a wise response to concerning news about health risks such as these?

While panic and catastrophic thinking are unhelpful, a measured approach to having a stock of ready supplies may bring some peace of mind? Toiletries, water, non-perishable food, and a stack of really good books may be a good place to start. Two weeks' worth won't take up much space, and it may come in handy.

If you're symptomatic, stay home. We can each do our part to stem a spread if we ourselves are unwell. This is good practice with any flu or cold: we can respect our selves and our others simply by resting and healing when we're sick.

While you're tucked in

If you're under the weather and finding some unexpected down time, consider our 800 charities and the work they're doing to aid the vulnerable, ill, and unseen every day.

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